How This Experiment With Frogs Helped Me Realize My Power Of Choice

There's this experiment with frogs that very much illustrates the point I want to make today. We will be using just a little bit of biology in this article.

Surely you must remember you studied at school that, unlike humans, frogs are poikilothermic animals. It means that they are not capable of maintaining a constant temperature within their bodies. Therefore, their temperature varies according to the environment they find themselves in.

I want to share this experiment and the lessons towards personal growth and the power of choice to be learned from it with you.

The Boiling Frog Experiment

So, scientists decided to do two experiments with frogs. The first experiment was to throw the frog into boiling water and see how they would react.

And how do you think the frogs reacted when they were thrown directly into hot boiling water? Well, you probably got it right. Each one of them would immediately try to jump out of the boiling water. They would try to do whatever it took to escape that unbearable condition.

In the second part of the experiment, same scientists just put frogs into a very comfortable normal temperature water. The frogs would not jump out of the water, because it was very relaxing.

But then, the scientists slowly and steadily raised the water temperature. It started at 25 degrees Celsius (C) and then, 1 minute later, 26 deg C, and so on. They did this until the water got to 100 deg C and started to boil.

What Happened In The Second Part Of The Experiment?

Well, no single frog made any attempt at any time to jump out of the water. What was happening was that they were constantly adapting to gradual changes in external circumstances, even though they were getting more adverse as time went by.

They shunned assessing how this gradual change in the external circumstances was making them feel. And because the temperature change was gradual, they didn't realize that the temperature was rising and slowly killing them.

They didn't realize that it would eventually get them killed, which is exactly what happened. By the end of this second experiment, the boiling water killed all frogs from this second group.

They had the option and the freedom, at any given moment, to jump out of the water. But they never did that!

How Does It Apply To Modern Society

Now, what am I trying to communicate by sharing this analogy here? This is virtually how we live our lives in modern society. When we are young, we are full of dreams, and we want to make them happen!

But day after day, as our life progresses forward, we keep settling for less than what we planned for ourselves. And settling for far less than we deserve. And because this happens in a progressive and slow manner, we don't notice as it is unfolding.

Until we open our eyes and we are 90 years old! Our lives have passed by, and we remained in the water that once felt comfortable. True! But as time progressed forward, it was killing us slowly, softly and progressively, yet we never realized that.

Conclusion

Don't be like the second group of frogs. You can jump out from your status quo, whenever you want. Whatever your situation is, you always have a way out.

You have 100 ways out into experiencing better versions of realities available to you at any given time. You just need to become aware of that!

And just like the frogs had the option the whole time to jump out of the water that was slowly boiling their brains, so do you!

And, if you want to dig further in the step-by-step process to work on your inner-perception about yourself and completely transform your life for the better, I dive deeper into this subject in this presentation of The Holistic Mindset method. Here I share with you a unique mindset method that combines mental, emotional, spiritual and biological intelligence, so you can live up to your full potential in all areas of your life.

Click here to watch the full presentation on how to upgrade your mindset


Post a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *